Spring Meetings

PhD Course in CONVERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR BIOMOLECULAR SYSTEMS (TeCSBi)

Series of seminar events in which the PhD students of the TeCSBi PhD Course present emerging topics of transversal interest related to their research field. At the end of the presentations, the PhD students interact with the public leaving room for questions, curiosities and exchange of opinions. The events are open to PhD students, structured staff of the Department and students of the Master's Degree Courses.

PhD meeting

PhD Course in CONVERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR BIOMOLECULAR SYSTEMS (TeCSBi)

Annual meeting organized by the PhD students of the TeCSBi PhD Course during which the PhD students themselves present the main results and the progress of their research projects. The event takes place as a real scientific conference, in which prestigious national and international guests also participate as invited speakers. The event is opened to the university and company supervisors / tutors of the PhD students, and sponsoring companies.

PhD Meeting 2024

Planned 16-18 September, 2024 at UNIMIB (program and details available soon)

Our Vision

PhD Course in CONVERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR BIOMOLECULAR SYSTEMS (TeCSBi)

Overview

The Doctoral Course in Convergent Technologies for Biomolecular Systems (TeCSBi) is based on a cultural project that focuses on biological systems studied from the point of view of specific emerging properties, exploiting innovative technologies and analyzing the different levels of complexity, from ecosystemic to molecular level. The study of complex biological functions, their modulation and engineering represents an element of value for biotechnological innovation and for technological transfer to the industry and the territory.

The training project benefits from the presence in the Doctoral Board of interdisciplinary and complementary skills in the biological, biotechnological, chemical, bioinformatics and computational fields. The Board also includes teachers and national and international experts from universities and research centers who encourage the creation of scientific collaboration networks and promote the enrichment of the educational background of doctoral students. Starting from the 40th cycle, periodic consultation with the societal actors is relevant and constitutes a fundamental support for the Quality Assurance processes of the Doctorate course allowing further improvements for the training of doctoral students. In recent years, teamwork among the PhD students, supported by the teaching and training activities proposed by the Doctoral Course, has culminated in the development of large, collaborative and synergistic projects, in Research Responsible Innovation (RRI) logic and with an international vision.

TeCSBi's research activities are mainly focused on three pillars:

i) Study of complex biological functions: with molecular and Systems Biology approaches also exploiting modeling, computational and bioinformatic analyses: this pillar includes lines of research on systems understood as cellular units, organs, individuals, microbial communities and ecosystems. This integration is particularly virtuous, creating synergies where the computational language and skills of each discipline allow the integrated reading of experimental evidence and data analysis.

ii) Synthetic Biology, Bio-organic Chemistry and Green Chemistry: the most well-known principles of Green Chemistry, outlined in the 12 points of its manifesto, in this pillar are associated with the frontier technologies of synthetic biology, which is increasingly aimed at reducing "time to market". In continuity with the first pillar, the activities also include the development of new molecules of interest for medicinal chemistry, and new theranostic systems based on nanotechnology.

iii) Characterization of biodiversity and bioprospecting: this area includes both research aimed at conserving, monitoring and restoring biodiversity, and projects to enhance biological resources, including residual biomass. Of particular interest are bioprospecting activities that exploit chemical and biological technologies to identify bioactive molecules, genes, phytocomplexes and various products to create new foods, cosmetics, drugs and nutraceuticals.

Our vision

The Doctoral Course in Convergent Technologies for Biomolecular Systems aims to train scientifically high-skilled figures capable of carrying out research and innovation activities in the field of biological and biotechnological sciences, exploiting advanced technologies to analyze and integrate in a multidisciplinary way the complexity of biological systems, their dynamics and interactions, to also generate efficient biotechnological processes. The training proposal has a multidisciplinary approach, functionally connecting different areas by adopting biostatistical and bioinformatics modeling systems to interpret complex biological information, and returning qualitative and quantitative information. These elements constitute a valuable process, capable of stimulating the technical-scientific evolution of the Doctoral Course, and therefore of the Doctoral Students. Elements of valorization, dissemination and technological transfer of research are also delivered thanks to synergistics collaborations with the territory (e.g., institutions, companies, consortia), which create a shared “milieu” for doctoral students.

Considering the University's support for the entire Research and Innovation chain and the intrinsic multidisciplinarity and spirit of collaboration that characterize the TeCSBi Board, the Doctoral Course aims at a progressive improvement and evolution of its training project to guarantee a continuous alignment with the frontiers of biological and biotechnological innovation, increase internationalization and promote an effective transfer of its results towards the productive manufacturing processes and society. This will allow doctoral students to acquire interdisciplinary professional profiles to enter universities and research centers at a national and international level,  to operate in private contexts as well as institutions to define research and innovation strategies in the biological and biotechnological fields. Central elements of the TeCSBi strategic vision are i) the acquisition by doctoral students of biomolecular, bioinformatic and computational knowledge fundamental to understanding and describing biological complexity, and where possible redesigning it in a "human & planet wellbeing" key; ii) a shared vision of projects capable of integrating visions of different stakeholders; iii) a strong connection with the territory and businesses to facilitate and encourage constructive contamination.

In this context, the skills present in TeCSBi permit to align the doctoral projects with different themes of the PNRR, the Next Generation EU agenda, the Green Deal and the upcoming Restoration Law, where The One Health approach allows to develop a multidisciplinary research context and cutting-edge transdisciplinary system that brings together human well-being, biodiversity/environmental well-being and the use of technologies for transition processes.

Educational offer

The implementation of a structured and complete educational offer at a disciplinary level is a key tool to provide doctoral students with the necessary means to deal with the entire research chain: from the field of curiosity-driven research up to scientific and technological innovation and to its valorisation. In addition to stimulating the participation of doctoral students in the transdisciplinary teaching proposals offered by the Doctoral School (LINK), the objective for the next few years is to further involve the teachers belonging to the TeCSBi College in holding advanced courses (for example PDF) for the doctoral students through activities of “learn-by-doing” and “flipped class”. At the same time, it is intended to strengthen relations with foreign universities and expand training courses in collaboration with the non-academic sector by providing supervisors from the world of businesses, institutions and the third sector. It is in fact important to remember that also thanks to industrial doctorate positions (such as High Apprenticeship courses), one of the main training purposes is to acquire new knowledge and encourage technological-application transfer. In this context, even students involved in fundamental research activities can benefit by acquiring skills to operate in an operational environment and at the same time corporate PhD students can experience the dimension of curiosity driven as a trigger for innovation. These acquisitions are verified through scheduled events of discussion in which the Coordinator meets the PhD students of all the ongoing cohorts as well as the individual cohorts for moments of comparison, debriefing and planning.

Enhancement of Research

As underlined in the University Strategic Plan (see here)USP, scientific research is the engine of technological innovation that allows the process of economic growth and human development to be fueled and in this the University of Milan-Bicocca has demonstrated its ability to generate high-quality research. Doctoral training is the cornerstone for scientific research and a bridge between the University and the territory, therefore it must aim to generate highly qualified, competitive figures who are in step with technological progress in various fields of application, without forgetting the aspects of social, environmental and economical sustainability.

In this context, the TeCSBi Doctoral Course intends to further exploit its multidisciplinary infrastructure, its adherence to the principles of Open Science, and its consolidated links with industry and other territorial and social realities in order to support inclusive projects with clear impact and suitable technology transfer strategies. This vision is implemented by supporting doctoral students in dialogue initiatives with civil society and the territory with the ultimate aim of stimulating conscious discussion aimed at collaboration and co-planning and the transformation of research into social value. In this context, the TeCSBi Doctoral Course assists the Department's strategies for the strengthening of RRI  models and tools and for the promotion of dissemination and training actions aimed at citizens on the transversal themes The One Health, ecological transition, prevention and biomedicine. To facilitate the acquisition of skills related to technology transfer, the interaction of PhD students is encouraged through seminar teaching moments with the staff of the spin-off and patent offices, and participation as spectators in events dealing with Innovation and Entrepreneurship themes.

Expected career and professional opportunities

The TeCSBi Doctorate Course supports the training of professional profiles who have gained experience and approaches of disciplinary integration and convergence, interaction with external, national and foreign bodies, sector associations and industries, and who have translated this training into a professional redefinition that includes the foundations of RRI, rooted in the territory and in society.

This approach allows PhDs to develop, by the end of their training course, a professional awareness capable of dealing with the continuous dynamics of innovation in the biological and biotechnological field. In fact, the Doctoral Course aims to train innovation promoters who can elicit impacts from the smallest and most integrated realities of the territory, to broader contexts, also at the level of policy makers, having developed the ability to involve and understand different categories of stakeholders. The training received by TeCSBi doctoral students will promote professional opportunities in various sectors and areas, such as:
- Curiosity-driven scientific research in the biological, biotechnological and bioinformatics fields at national and international academic and extra-academic research centers;
- Scientific-managerial coordination within national and international research and regulatory centers;
- Industrial research and innovation including design, screening, and production (following the principles of the Design, Build, Test, Learn, DBTL cycle) of molecules of interest for the chemical, pharmaceutical and agri-food industries (proteins, metabolites, fine and bulk chemicals , nutraceuticals, nano-particles and nano-derivatives, biomaterials);
- Development and optimization of industrial processes in a biotechnological key: from bioprospecting and reuse of resources (circular economy and circular bioeconomy) aimed at improving production and developing new products (rational by design, safe by design, sustainable by design), to the identification of biological and nanotechnological processes to implement diagnostic, prevention and treatment systems for diseases;
- Management of biological and natural resources in order to fill professional figures (green jobs) for the monitoring, conservation and restoration of biodiversity and the environment;
- Definition, design and re-design of sustainable production systems in different fields: from organic raw materials to rapidly growing sectors such as agri-food, nutraceuticals, cosmetics and medical devices;
- Diagnostics (molecular, physiological), theragnostics and therapy, development of new biocompatible materials.

PhD students

PhD Course in CONVERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR BIOMOLECULAR SYSTEMS (TeCSBi)

List of TeCSBi PhD students and titles of their research projects

Cycle XXXIX

ARMANNI ALICE
Developing a framework to improve skin microbiome research: from data to application

BORKA GERGO
Development of Organ-on-Chip Based Methodologies for in Vitro Novel Compound Testing

CHELAZZI MARIA RITA
Exploring the role of mDia1 in the biogenesis of lamellipodia and ruffles

COLOMBO BEATRICE
Biodiversity adaptation to urban habitats: a multi-Omic approach to implement innovative conservation and ecological transition strategies

CORALLO FLAVIO
Exploring the function of the CST complex at DNA double-strand breaks

DRAMIS MARTINA
Engineering microbial cell factories for biomanufacturing chemicals and modified natural polymers suited for the formulation of high performance elastomeric nano compounds

FAVARETTO LIDIA
Life Cycle Assessment approaches for building sustainable Nature-based Solutions in urban settings

FRIGERIO VERGA MIRKO
Biotechnological approaches to support sustainable agriculture

LAPI FRANCESCO
Multi-omics data analysis to characterize sex-specific metabolic shifts during embryo development

MISITANO FRANCESCA
Interaction between myofilament and SERCA2a activators on heart muscle mechanics

MORETTI LUCA
Spectroscopic characterization of biomolecular determinants of ageing processes in physiological and pathological conditions

PEROTTI SUSANNA
Enhancement of microbial biodiversity to promote environmental and human health

TAGLIETTI LORENZO
Multivalent and multifunctional glyco-tools to address neurodegenerative disorders: from small molecules to nanodevices

VULCANO EDVIGE
Development of experimental human Neural Stem Cells treatment for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Cycle XXXVIII

ABBIATI FRANCESCO
Quercetin extends yeast chronological lifespan, reducing oxidative stress and modulating carbon metabolism

AFANGA MIRIAM KUKU
Identification of miRNA-based biomarkers predictive of lung cancer treatment response and mechanisms involved in lung cancer progression

BARBERA MARIA CHIARA
Reactivation of miR-29 to Mitigate Tumor Adaptation and Hormone Resistance in Prostate Cancer

BARRECA MARCO
Multidimensional data integration to capture intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms driving treatment benefit in breast cancer

BERETTA LAURA
NO PAINs NO GAINs: the importance of TR-FRET interference assays for the validation of true-positive hits

BIANCHINI STEFANO
Roles of phytoextracts in colorectal cancer prevention and therapy

BRACCHI MADDALENA
Mimicking extracellular matrix (ECM) features for meniscal regeneration: from biomolecular signatures to biomaterials design

FLORINDI CHIARA
Non-genetic optical modulation of cardiac excitable cells by membrane-targeted azobenzene photoswitches

GHISLENI GIULIA
UniBiome project: new microbiome-inspired approaches for a sustainable urban regeneration of Universities

GIOVENALE ANGELA MARIA GIADA
The impact of Rai1 haploinsufficiency on lipid metabolism and autophagic flux in Smith-Magenis Syndrome

ITALIA ALICE
Study on the impact of Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) modulation in rare inflammatory-fibrotic diseases

LAMBIASE ALESSIA
Characterization of plant bioactive molecules in eukaryotic models of Parkinson’s disease

METALLO ALESSIA
Intracellular Ca2+ dynamics modulation by istaroxime andits metabolite in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

RANALLI ROSA
Assessment of ecosystem pollination service in italian urban environments: first results and future perspectives

RUOTOLO GIORGIA
Primary cilium characterization in joubert syndrome somatic cells

SASSI    TOMMASO
Heterologous expression of oxidative enzymes in microbial cells for bioconversion of raw materials to products of interest for the pharmaceutical industry

SEMINARA SERENA
Contribution of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein’s functions of microglia and brain resident macrophages in physiological and pathological conditions

TOINI ELISA
Phylogenetic analysis for research of plant active compounds

ZERBATO BARBARA
Exploiting DNA damage protein O-glycosylation to enhance chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer

Cycle XXXVII

BAIONI CHIARA
Killing cancer cells by targeting the tumor microenvironment: study of TRAIL subcellular and extracellular localization in a CAFs model

BUTTI PIETRO
Microbial bioprocesses and synthetic biology for fostering circularity in the textile industry

DAMA ELISA
Development of a diagnostic kit for the early detection of lung cancer

DE SIMONE GIULIA
Mass spectrometry-based approaches for the identification of metabolic trajectories as sentinels of the frailty status in the elderly

FRIGERIO CHIARA
Exploring the interconnections between DNA-RNA hybrids and the DNA damage response

FUMAGALLI SARA
SKIOME Project: unraveling the human skin and built environment microbiomes interplay

MARCHETTI ALESSANDRO
Antarctic glycosyl hydrolases for marine polysaccharides degradation: from discovery to characterization

MERONI MARINA
Induction of adipocytic differentiation in liposarcomas: a new approach to improve the effectiveness of the available therapies against these rare neoplastic forms

NEGRINI BEATRICE
Safe and Sustainable nano-enabled antimicrobials to reduce the presence of contaminants of emerging concern (biotic and abiotic) in the aquatic environments

PENSOTTI ROBERTA
Nutraceutical approach to increase healthy aging using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism

PETRELLA SERENA
Identification of new therapeutic strategies for mucinous ovarian carcinoma using CRISPR/Cas9 libraries

SENATORE VITTORIO GIORGIO
Yeast fermentation for the upcycling of PET monomers

SILVESTRI GIUSEPPE
Exploring Thermodynamic Properties of Biomolecules: Case Studies of FLUC Ion Channel and Flavodoxin Redox Enzyme through High-Performance Computing-based Simulations

TESTA FILIPPO
Synthesis and spatio-temporal imaging of nanoparticles in cultured cells by Ultrafast Electron Microscopy for tumor theranostics

ZAGO MIRKO
Biocatalytic preparation of small esters

Doctoral Board

PhD Course in CONVERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR BIOMOLECULAR SYSTEMS (TeCSBi)

Board of the TeCSBi Doctoral Course (40th Cycle)

UNIVERSITY OF MILANO-BICOCCA

AIROLDI Cristina, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Associate Professor.
BESOZZI Daniela, Dep. of Informatics, Systems and Communication, Associate Professor.
BONETTI Diego, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Associate Professor.
BRANDUARDI Paola, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Full Professor.
CAMPONE Luca, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Associate Professor.
CASIRAGHI Maurizio, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Full Professor.
CHIARADONNA Ferdinando, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Associate Professor.
CIPOLLA Laura Francesca, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Associate Professor.
COCCETTI Paola [RESP. QUALITY ASSURANCE], Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Associate Professor.
DAMIANI Chiara, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Associate Professor.
DE GIOIA Luca, Department of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Full Professor.
DI GENNARO Patrizia, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Associate Professor.
FERRARI Daniela, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Assistant Professor.
FIANDRA Luisa, Dep.of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Associate Professor.
GALIMBERTI Andrea [COORDINATOR], Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Associate Professor.
GUGLIELMETTI Simone Domenico, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Full Professor.
LA FERLA Barbara, Dep. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Associate Professor.
LABRA Massimo, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Full Professor
LODOLA Francesco, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Associate Professor.
LONGHESE Maria Pia [VICE-COORDINATOR], Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Full Professor.
LOTTI Marina, Department of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Full Professor.
MANTECCA Paride, Dep. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Associate Professor.
ORLANDI Ivan, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Associate Professor.
PELLIZZOLA Mattia, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Associate Professor.
PERI Francesco, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Full Professor.
PESCINI Dario, Dep. of Statistics and Quantitative Methods, Associate Professor.
PORRO Danilo, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Full Professor.
PROSPERI Davide, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Full Professor.
ROCCHETTI Marcella, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Associate Professor.
SERRA Immacolata [RESP. TEACHING PLAN], Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Assistant Professor.
VANONI Marco Ercole, Dep. of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Full Professor.

FOREIGN UNIVERSITIES, RESEARCH CENTERS

LONGHI Sonia Rachele Agata, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, France.
MARTIN William, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Germany.
MORRISSEY John, University College Cork, Ireland.
NIKEL Pablo Ivan, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Denmark.
WINDERICKX Joris, Leuven University, Belgium.

COMPANIES, PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIONS, CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS, RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

JIMENEZ-BARBERO Jesus, CIG BIOGUNE, Spain.
PANDIT Abhay, Centre for Research in Medical Devices, Galway, University of Ireland.
BIGINI Paolo, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche "Mario Negri" – IRCCS, Italy.
BIANCHI Fabrizio, Fondazione IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza, Italy.